Sunday, March 30, 2014

Pilots And Flight Attendants Confess Their Best Kept Secrets

30 Pilots And Flight Attendants Confess The Best Kept Secrets You Dont Know About Flying:

THE TRUE STORY BEHIND THOSE OXYGEN MASKS

That if the oxygen masks drop down, you only have about 15 minutes of oxygen from the point of pulling them down. However, that is more than enough time for the pilot to take us to a lower altitude where you can breathe normally.


More important – at altitude, you have 15-20 seconds before you pass out. Put yours on first, then do your kids. Passing out for a few seconds won’t harm the kids.

DON’T DRINK WATER ON A PLANE THAT DIDN’T COME FROM A BOTTLE

Former Lufthansa cargo agent here.

Do not EVER drink water on an aircraft that did not come from a bottle. Don’t even TOUCH IT. The reason being the ports to purge lavatory shit and refill the aircraft with potable water are within feet from each other and sometimes serviced all at once by the same guy. Not always, but if you’re not on the ramp watching, you’ll never know.

The drinking water, that used for making coffee, tea, etc., should NEVER be consumed. The holding tanks in these sometimes 60 year old planes are never cleaned. They have accumulated so much greenish grime on the walls that in some places it can be inches thick.

Whatever you do, do not drink the water in the lav. It is bad enough to “wash” your hands in it. We sanitize the water tank at selected maintenance intervals, however parasites build tolerances to these cleaners.

This one is very well known by all airline employees.


THE REAL REASON THE LIGHTS ON THE AIRPLANE DIM WHEN LANDING

When a plane is landing at night, they dim the interior lights in case you need to evacuate upon landing… your eyes are already adjusted to the darkness so you’ll be able to see better once outside the plane.


POWER OF A PILOT

If a passenger is causing a scene in the jetway he can refuse to let them on and take off without them.

The captain has almost limitless authority when the doors are closed. He is allowed to arrest people, write fines and even take the will of a dying passenger

THOSE LAVATORIES UNLOCK FROM THE OUTSIDE

You are able to unlock airplane lavatories from the outside. There is usually a lock mechanism concealed behind the no smoking badge on the door. Just lift the flap up and slide the bolt to unlock.


A TRICK FOR MAKING MORE SPACE FOR YOURSELF

Arm rests – aisle and window seat: Run your hand along the underside of the armrest, just shy of the joint you’ll feel a button. Push it, and it will lift up. Adds a ton of room to the window seat and makes getting out of the aisle a helluva lot easier.


HOW A PILOT APPROACHES LANDING

When you experience a hard landing in bad weather it wasn’t because of a lack of pilot skills but it is in fact intentional. If the runway is covered in water the airplane has to touch down hard in order to puncture the water layer and prevent aqua planing.

“Landings are nothing more than controlled crashes.” Pilot friend quote.


HOW DIRTY EVERYTHING TRULY IS

I worked for Southwest as a flight attendant. Those blankets and pillows? Yeah, those just get refolded and stuffed back in the bins between flights. Only fresh ones I ever saw were on an originating first flight in the morning in a provisioning city. Also, if you have ever spread your peanuts on your tray and eaten, or really just touched your tray at all, you have more than likely ingested baby poo. I saw more dirty diapers laid out on those trays than food. And those trays, yeah, never saw them cleaned or sanitized once.

I used to work for warehouse that supplied a certain airline with items. The headsets that are given to you are not new, despite being wrapped up. They are taken off the flight, “cleaned”, and then packaged again.

MOST FLIGHTS ARE ALSO CARRYING HUMAN ORGANS

The majority of domestic flights have human remains or organs on them. I work below wing as a baggage handler. Watch out the window for long boxes that say, “Head” at one end… Oh, and I can fit 150 bags in bin 3 of a Boeing 737-300.

PLANES WITHOUT ENGINES CAN STILL GLIDE FOR A REALLY LONG TIME

A pilot told me if both engines fail, a plane can glide 6 nautical miles for every 5000 feet. So at 35,000 feet, a plane can glide about 42 miles without power. Its why most accidents happen landing or taking off.



PLANES HAVE A HARD TIME FLYING ON HOT DAYS

I worked the ramp in Phoenix. On especially hot days, we had to offload cargo because planes struggled to take off in the thin air.

HOW TO TELL FROM THE GROUND IF A PLANE IS BEING HIJACKED

If the plane is being hijacked when the pilot lands they will leave the wing flaps up that slow the plane down, this is to signal the airport that there is something happening in the plane.


Source: http://viralquake.com/2014/03/24/30-pilots-and-flight-attendants-confess-the-best-kept-secrets-you-dont-know-about-flying/

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Why Do Airlines Keep ‘Black Box’ Flight Data Trapped on Planes?


To solve the mystery of what happened to Malaysia Airlines (MAS:MK) Flight MH370, investigators need the airplane’s data and voice recorders. In an airplane tragedy, however, the information stored in the so-called black box inevitably ends up inside a wreck. This seems like a terrible place to keep the clue you need to find most.

As investigators scour the Gulf of Thailand and waters as far north as Hong Kong for debris from the Boeing (BA) 777-200 that vanished en route to Beijing on Saturday, there’s almost no indication yet of what doomed the flight and the 239 passengers on board. So far, at least, no wreckage or jet fuel has been found. Without recovering the black box, there’s little way to know what caused a plane cruising at 35,000 feet to disappear from radar.

Why not transmit this flight data off the plane so it’s accessible almost instantly? Airlines, after all, track each of their flights everywhere in the world and can advise crews on course adjustments, security alerts, quick weather changes, and a host of other situations. Passengers are routinely offered in-air Wi-Fi and live television these days. So why keep vital data trapped on the plane?

The answer is mostly about one issue: cost. Sending all the data from each flight in real time via satellite would be enormously expensive. A 2002 study by L-3 Aviation Recorders (LLL) and a satellite provider found that a U.S. airline flying a global network would need to spend $300 million per year to transmit all its flight data, even assuming a 50 percent reduction in future satellite transmission costs. And that’s just a single airline. Commercial airline disasters, meanwhile, are becoming even more uncommon as technology and techniques improve—in part thanks to lessons from past crashes—so there’s little incentive for investing heavily in real-time data.

Businessweek last explored this question in July 2009 as French and Brazilian authorities searched a wide section of the Atlantic Ocean for a missing Air France (AF:FP) flight. The data recorders aboard the Airbus (AIR:FP) A330 remained missing for almost two years, some 2 miles beneath the surface, before searchers finally recovered them.

If the Malaysia Airlines flight did go down at sea, as searchers believe, waters in the suspected crash area are much shallower than in the region of the Atlantic where the French jet went down. In both cases, meanwhile, the flight data and cockpit voice recorders were made by Honeywell (HON) Aerospace. Despite the conventional term “black box,” the Honeywell recorders and most others in use are actually bright orange in color.

Of course, there remains the possibility that a powerful enough calamity could have obliterated the data boxes on the Malaysia flight, leaving investigators without their best hope for discovering what went wrong. No data recorders were ever recovered from the two Boeing airplanes that crashed into the World Trade Center.

Source: http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-03-10/malaysia-air-crash-why-do-airlines-keep-black-box-flight-data-trapped-on-planes

Saturday, March 1, 2014

Ryanair Will Fly to US for $14, CEO Says


Ryanair's colorful CEO is in the travel headlines again. But this time it's not for promising to someday charge passengers for using the bathroom in-flight.

Michael O'Leary said his airline plans to offer flights from Europe to the United States for as little as $14. Flights from the United States to Europe will be even cheaper, he said.

He made his remarks at the Irish Hotels Federation conference earlier this week, as reported by The Telegraph. A Ryanair representative confirmed to ABC News O'Leary's comments at the conference.

The flights would leave from up to 14 major European cities to 12 to 14 destinations in the United States.

But Ryanair does not yet operate any aircraft capable of making long-haul flights. It needs to acquire appropriate aircraft first and Ryanair told ABC News it "will not engage in speculation."

“We can make money on 99 cent fares in Europe,” O’Leary said at the conference. “Not every seat will be 10 euros [about $14], of course. There will also need to be a very high number of business or premium seats.”

But in true Ryanair style, expect to pay up for the "extras.” The airline charges fees for bags, seat assignments, credit card transactions and printed boarding passes.

Using the bathroom remains free of charge.

Source: http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/ryanair-fly-us-14-ceo/story?id=22704498